Honeymoon, Travel

September 14, 2020

6 Minimoon Destinations in Washington State: A Complete Guide

So many couples have had to postpone their honeymoon due to COVID-19, or decided to just deal with the that “little detail” later (there’s more pressing concerns.) If that’s you, let me be an advocate for planning a minimoon! And to inspire your planning, I’ve created a guide with 6 beautiful minimoon destinations in Washington State.

I think it’s so important for newlywed couples to actually ENJOY the feelings of excitement and joy after saying “I do.” This means not immediately going back to work and life’s other commitments the next day like nothing ever happened!

Especially for couples who may have decided to postpone their “big reception,”and have an intimate event now. The least you can do for yourselves is take a couple days to get away and celebrate as newlyweds!

And the beauty of a minimoon is that it shouldn’t require too much time, money, or travel. It is realistic and doable for just about any couple. (And you can still take that big honeymoon in the future!)

Plus, if you live in the greater Seattle area, like me, then you know that we are SO fortunate to live within driving distance of an endless list of beautiful destinations. No air travel required!

I know it can be hard to choose where to go, so I hope this guide to minimoon destinations in Washington State helps you get started. Happy planning!

P.S.

As a lot of these destinations are more rural by nature, PLEASE be respectful of the local communities. Always wear a mask and follow guidance to prevent the spread of COVID-19, which can be so detrimental to smaller towns that don’t have easy access to medical facilities. 

Check the websites for specific businesses to confirm whether they’re open/closed during the pandemic (as the situation can change quickly.)

Lastly, I must acknowledge that as a resident of the greater Seattle area, I inhabit the traditional land of the Coast Salish people, including the Duwamish People. I would like to express my respect and gratitude for the land, and for the Duwamish People.  Each of the destinations listed here are also on the traditional lands of indigenous peoples, which I hope to acknowledge, as well. (I’d love to be corrected on any inaccuracies.)

Acknowledging the land on which we live and visit is just one small means of honoring and respecting the past and present of the indigenous communities. I hope you’ll join me in committing to learn more about the history of the lands that we occupy and how we can act in solidarity with indigenous communities. (If you live in the greater Seattle area, one small thing you can do is pay Real Rent to the Duwamish Tribe.)

Sequim, WA & Port Angeles, WA

(Traditional land of the Coast Salish people, including the S’Klallam people and Jamestown S’klallam Tribe)

A photo of the mountain landscape at Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park

What to Do

Where to Eat

  • Drink ALL the coffee – pick-up some locally roasted beans or drive through one of the MANY espresso stands. Here’s a few coffee spots to get you started:
    • Rainshadow Cafe
    • Hurricane Coffee Company
    • Fogtown Coffee Bar
    • Easy Street Coffee and Tea House
    • The Coffee Box
  • Grab breakfast at Oak Table Cafe in Sequim (and plan for leftovers) or at the Chestnut Cottage in Port Angeles.
  • If you want to treat yourselves to something a little fancier, try Alder Wood Bistro or Blondie’s Plate in Sequim. 
  • Grab a quintessential lunch at Toga’s Soup House in Port Angeles.

Where to Stay

Columbia River Gorge

(Traditional home of the Yakama people; the Wasco, Warm Springs, and Paiute bands which now constitute the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs)

What to Do

What to Eat

Where to Stay

San Juan Island

(Traditional land of the Coast Salish people, including the S’klallam, Samish, W̱SÁNEĆ, Lhaq’temish [Lummi], Lək̓ʷəŋən Peoples, and Tulalip Tribes)

A view off the coast of San Juan Island

What to Do

Where to Eat

Where to Stay

Mt. Rainier

(Traditional land of the Nisqually, Puyallup, Yakama, Cowlitz, and Squaxin Island Peoples and Muckleshoot Tribe)

A photo of a valley below Mt. Rainier

What to Do

  • Hike your heart out!
  • Get cozy in your room after hiking your heart out

There are so many resources for hiking on Mount Rainier. Here’s a links to a few to get you started:

What to Eat

Being a literal mountain, Mt. Rainier is not your mecca of fine dining. Plan to pack in the bulk of the food you’ll need during your stay. If you’re craving an actual meal, here’s a few spots in the vicinity:

Where to Stay

Port Townsend

(Traditional land of the Chemacum People and the Coast Salish people, including the S’Klallam and Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe)

A photo of Victorian architecture in Port Townsend

Photo by Joe Mabel is licensed under CCC BY-SA 3.0

What to Do

What to Eat

Where to Stay

Lummi Island

(Traditional land of the Coast Salish people, including the Lhaq’temish [Lummi] People)

Lummi Island Ferry Dock | Andrew E. Larsen | Flickr

“Lummi Island Ferry Dock  by Andrew E. Larsen is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

What to Do

  • Nothing! Lummi Island is the perfect spot to take a break from ‘real life’
  • Stop by the Lummi Island Saturday Market (every Saturday from 10 am to 1 pm.)
  • Hike the Baker Preserve Trail.
  • Pick up fresh flowers and produce from Full Bloom Farm.
  • Visit the beach! Try Sunset Beach or Church Beach.
  • Donate to Sacred Sea, the Tokitae Fund of Lummi Nation’s Lhaqtemish Foundation which directly supports the Salish Sea Campaign.

What to Eat

Where to Stay

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